Tag Archives: Canning

Meyer Lemon Curd, YUM!

I’m going to post another throwback blog post.  The reason for this is I had made a batch of my Meyer Lemon Curd with the intent to use as a filling to either Lemon Bars or Pie, but things got away from me, so I stashed it in a gallon sized zip-top bag full in the freezer for later.

 

 

We’ve been invited to many Cocktail Parties in our Neighborhood since going into SIP Mode, sitting outdoors and maintaining our Social Distance, of course.

I was trying to dream up a Hostess Gift idea, and came up with this!

 

 

I just snipped a decent sized hole in the corner of the zip-bag and piped the Curd into a cleaned and sterilized half pint Mason Jar.  The frozen Curd was still quite malleable, but do be sure that you get as many of the air bubbles out with a plastic knife before sealing the jar.  The label I made myself on my laptop, printed that out, used some Craft Glue, Clear Wrap and some leftover ribbon that I have stashed away.  I added my Calling Card for our new Neighbor who invited a bunch of us over the other evening, and …

BAM!

Food As Gifts!

 

March 25, 2014

Years back, I use to watch Martha Stewart’s television programs and then, well you know, things happened.  One particular episode, I recall her making Lemon Curd and I thought that someday I’d try that.

My darling husband goes nuts for Lemon Meringue Pie and don’t ya know, that’s what’s in the middle of it (shhh, please don’t tell him that, he claims to HATE curd, “that sounds gross”).

I found some more Meyer Lemons of all places, at Walmart, so here goes.

Auntie’s Meyer Lemon Pie Filling

12 Egg Yolks (freeze the whites in two separate containers for later use, like frosting for a cake)

2 C granulated Sugar

6 Meyer Lemons, juiced (approx. 1 C of juice, no seeds please)

2 sticks of Butter, diced

Zest from the Meyer Lemons

This recipe makes approximately 2 pints.

In a metal or glass bowl (heat-proof), whisk the egg yolks and sugar.  Place the bowl over a pot of simmering water, making sure that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl.  Pour in the juice and stir continually with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon for about 10-15 minutes, until the mixture thickens.  Make sure not to allow the mixture to boil.  Add the butter and stir until melted and well incorporated.  Whisk in the reserved zest.

Carefully pour the curd into sterilized jars, best to use half pints or smaller mason jars, leaving ½ inch of head space.  With a damp paper towel, wipe the rim of the jars and seal with the lids and rings.

If you would like to ‘put up’ your bounty for later consumption, process them in boiling water for 20 minutes, allow to cool overnight and store for up to one year (if they last that long).

Should you not feel so inclined to ‘can’ your curd, simply cool and then refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

I gotta tell ya, the smell in the house was heavenly.  I got 4 half pint jars and then half of a 5th jar that I stashed in the `fridge for toast the next morning.  Not shown here was a huge dollop of Meyer Lemon Curd in my yogurt the following morning.

 

** Edit-2/2017- I was reading about dairy based canning recently; It is now recommended that instead of using the Water Bath method, Pressure Canning or Freezing is the preferred technique. **

Homemade Chunky Applesauce

Source: Homemade Chunky Applesauce

MMM!  I made another batch of this wonderful Chunky Apple Sauce the other day. This goes so well with just about anything on your table, at any meal.  This makes a thoughtful gift as well.  Oh, how about taking the family to a local Orchard and picking your own apples.  How ever you get your fruit, do please try this recipe.

Meyer Lemons Are In Season

My mother has been looking for Meyer Lemon Marmalade at every Farmer’s Market that we go to, but to no avail. I was in my favorite green grocers and they had the beginnings of this year’s crop, not a bad price either, $1.99 per pound. Being the fantastic daughter that I am, I made a batch for her, well all of us.

I did an Internet search for a sugar free recipe, but can you believe it? Not one! So, I had to piece together my own.

make sure to got out all of the seeds

I washed and de-seeded the fruit, saving the pips in a gauze spice bag for later use.

… halved, then quartered and lastly sliced the fruit as thinly as I could (I used by uber-sharp slicing knife)

… chucked the lemons along with that bag of seeds in to a non-reactive pot (I have a Le Creuset dutch oven) and just enough cool water to cover the fruit. I slapped on the lid and let it sit at room temperature for 24 hours. The aroma when you open that pot, MAN!

So now let’s cook some jam. Since we want this to be sugar free for mom, I did another search to find out about the different sugar substitutes. Splenda is recommended for canning along with a packette of ‘no sugar needed’ fruit pectin.

that's alot of Splenda

I opened a lot of packettes.

I simmered the pot of lemons and water for 10 minutes and then removed the seed-bag; continued to cook the fruit until reduced to about 4 cups. Add the sugar substitute and then the pectin, cook for 1 more minute. Carefully, I ladled the jam into my prepared jars.

Now we need to can these babies. I have a make-shift set up for canning, since I don’t do a lot of it. I wrap multiple rubber bands around my tongs, make a rack out of tin foil and use my 12 quart stock pot full of boiling water. It works for me! I bring the water to a full rolling boil and time it for 15 minutes, DING!

let the jam cool

Now I remove the jars with the tongs and rest them on some kitchen towels for 24 hours. We let them sit in the back of the cupboard for 2 weeks before we dove in.

Mom and I enjoyed ours on some biscuits. I also gave a jar to my chef-gal-pal Joey, who used it on I think she said fish and lamb chops. Well, we have no more sugar free Meyer Lemon Marmalade, so I made a batch of sugared jam, sorry mom.

Meyer Lemon Marmalade made with Sugar

It’s so pretty!