Tag Archives: Hawaiian foods

Favorite Dinner From Back Home

Back home in Hawaii, DH and I lived on the same property as my parents; I did a lot of the cooking for all of us. Once we all moved here to the middle of the desert, my mom decided that she wanted to have her own apartment. Mom now has to cook for herself, and it ain’t like my food, I’ll just say that! So when I invite mom up to our place for a meal with us, I make a point to make recipes that I’ve learned how to make from home.

Favorite Dinner From Back Home

This past Sunday we had mom over and I made Teriyaki chicken, my quick cucumber kim chee and marinated bean sprouts. My husband and I are back on our ‘no white foods’ diet, so that meant no steamed white rice for us, only mom.

Teri-chicken

I like to cut the chicken up and then garnish with more green onions and sesame seeds

My ono-licious (delicious in my world) teri-chicken was adapted from many recipes that I have found over the years.

½ C. low sodium Soy Sauce (you know I love Aloha brand)

¼ C. Vegetable oil

2 tbsp. Brown Sugar

1 Garlic clove, smashed

1 tbsp. Fresh Ginger root, grated

1 tbsp. Sesame oil

1 tbsp. Mirin

2 Green Onions, minced

1 tsp. Sesame seeds

5 boneless-skinless Chicken thighs

Combine all the ingredients in a gallon-size zip top bag and shake until the sugar is dissolved. Add the chicken and refrigerate overnight, turning it over occasionally. Grill and EAT!!!

Bean Sprouts

The bean sprouts (Kong Namul) are a Korean dish that we would always have on our take-out plates in Hawaii. My sweet DH found this recipe for me in the newspaper. Before we left Hawaii, I made sure to collect what recipes I could. This is super easy, quick and makes a fantastic side dish with any BBQ meats. I’ve changed it ever so slightly for a milder vinegar bite.

½ lb. fresh Bean Sprouts (mung bean)

1 tbsp. Rice Vinegar

1 tbsp. Granulated Sugar

1 tsp. Sesame oil

1 tbsp. low sodium Soy Sauce (Ponzu would be nice too)

½ tsp. Sea Salt

2 Green Onions, minced

1/4 tsp. Sesame Seeds

Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil and toss in the sprouts. Bring back up to a boil and cook about 1 minute, until they are crisp-tender but still pliable. Drain and rinse under cold running water. In a large bowl, combine the ingredients above until the sugar is dissolved; add in the sprouts and toss to combine with the sauce. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled.

And we’ve talked about the quick cucumber kim chee before, it’s just so good! But, put all of these dishes together and you have a very typical meal back in Hawaii.  I asked my husband after we dropped mom off back at her place if he tought she enjoyed her evening and all he said was, “OH YEAH!”

ALOHA!

 

Love On A Plate From Hawaii, Zippy’s Chicken & Chili

I know that folks on the mainland talk about chicken and waffles, shot, we even had chicken and waffle potato chips yesterday (not a fan). Back home in Hawaii, on the island of Oahu to more specific, one of our favorite places to eat is Zippy’s. I would hope that you’ve already read about my quest to figure out how to make Zippy’s Macaroni Salad, the best in the world mac salad. I tried for years to figure out how to replicate this recipe, here in the middle of the desert and finally nailed it not so long ago. There are two other dishes that are equally renowned and those are Zippy’s Fried Chicken and Chili.

OH MY GRAVY ALL OVER MY TWO SCOOPS OF RICE!

That’s OMG! in my world, and I’m shouting because when you put those two together with two scoops of rice AND the mac salad, you will be in heaven.

When we first left Hawaii for Arizona and would go back for visits, we always brought home frozen packages of the Chili, the chicken, well, you just have to eat your share while you’re in Hawaii.

I think that I might almost be on to a mashed-up recipe of sorts that is getting very close to getting the chicken down too. I’ll let you know.

Now the Chili is a whole ‘nother bag of beans, it’s proving to be very difficult. It’s not quite like a Cincinnati chili, but kind of. As you can see, it’s very thick for one thing, and the taste is so unique. I’ve saved the ingredient panel from the box that the frozen package comes in, but I haven’t been able to get it right, YET!

In the mean time, we have one more package of frozen Zippy’s Chili in the deep freezer, so I guess that means that we have to make another trip back home!

Frozen Zippy’s Chili

ALOHA!

 

Repeat Of A Very Good Thing

I wanted to repost this about making my quick cucumber kim chee. As I was re-reading some of my past blogs, I noticed that I have more than one photo that includes this fast, easy and flavorful addition to just about any meal. If you are so inclined to make this side dish and you can’t find this product in your local ‘asian market’, try the hyperlink to Noh’s website and order it on line. If for some off chance you do not care for the kim chee, you can always create a unique gift for someone.

ALOHA!

My Kitchen In The Middle Of The Desert

I got a request today on the Cucumber Kim Chee, delish! And WAY easy to make.

I like Hot house or English Cucumbers, here in the middle of the desert, I can’t find Japanese Cucumbers. That varietal was developed by the University of Hawaii, and I highly doubt that I will ever find them here in AZ. No need to peel them, just a nice rinse under the tap.

I rough chop them into goodly bite-sized pieces, and plop them into a salad spinner. Take about 1-2 tablespoons of Sea Salt (or Kosher, whatever you have on hand), give them a mix around and leave them sit for 15 minutes. Rinse & drain well, that’s where the salad spinner comes in handy. In a non-reactive bowl (I use a glass one), dump in the cucs and hold your nose, this stuff will make you sneeze, cough, gasp. Sprinkle with some

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Sunday Brunch In Hawaii

As I was getting our Sunday Brunch ready this morning, I thought about what we’d be eating just about now in Hawaii.

Last May, DH and I were fortunate enough to be able to go home for the entire month. SIL, who still lives in Hawaii, was very gracious to be our host.

I took almost enough photos to fill up the memory card in my camera!

Let’s Grind!

Happy Super Bowl Sunday, Aloha

Hawaiian Guava Chicken and Fried Rice

Wow, I had to think about this one.  I did not know that there was such a thing as Hawaiian Fried Rice and  I have yet to find Guava Chicken elsewhere but Hawaii.

I don’t have a recipe, really, I just MAKE IT.

Guava chicken is something I learned from my SIL (DH’s sister). Every time that we all went to the beach for the day, she would bring Guava Chicken and Fried Rice. My BIL would grill the meat on his little hibachi and there’d be other goodies to nibble on after body surfing for the afternoon (I shouldn’t go there, it makes me homesick). To me, that’s beach food.

So years later, here we are in the middle of the desert and I NEED to have little pieces of home every so often. We’ve got plenty of sand here…

Guava Chicken

Hawaiian Guava Chicken

1 12oz. can Guava Nectar Concentrate

(if you can find the brands from Hawaii, that’s best, but Goya will do)

1 Garlic clove, crushed

1/2 C. Oyster Sauce

1/2 C. lightly packed Brown Sugar

1/2 C. Soy Sauce (I prefer low sodium Aloha Brand)

1/2 C. Ketchup

1/4 tsp. Chinese Five Spice

5 lbs. Chicken thighs (we buy boneless-skinless)

Combine all ingredients and allow to marinade for at least 24 hours, the longer the better. Grill (or bake or broil, I like the char, it’s more like going to the beach) until the meat is completely done, an internal temperature of 165º on an insta-read thermometer

Fried Rice

Hawaiian Fried Rice

this ain’t rocket science! it’s all just leftovers…

start off with steamed white rice (we use Calrose medium grain rice)

add whatever ‘goodies’ you like:

scrambled eggs or that omelet you didn’t finish

breakfast sausage (we use Linguica or Portuguese sausage)**

Spam, yup, that’s right Hawaii’s favorite meat!**

Green onions

White onions

if you must, frozen peas and carrots

Soy Sauce

Sesame Oil

Toasted Sesame Seeds to make it all pretty at the end

Preheat a large fry pan, or Wok if you have it, with some neutral oil like canola. Once you see wisps of smoke coming off the pan, let’s move fast

Throw in the rice, stir it around until it’s hot

Add in your goodies, stir again

Pour over enough soy sauce to just color the rice, barely

Stir; cover and cook for a few minutes

Dish it up with a drizzle of sesame oil and seeds, maybe some more chopped green onions

Hawaiian Guava Chicken and Fried Rice

**Tip – the Spam and the Linguica really make it, or some Teriyaki Chicken, SIL uses Turkey hotdogs and Bacon**

ALOHA

 

Try This Seadfood Salad

Tako, Octopus, Pulpo, Krake, He’e, in any language, it’s wonderful.

Tako Poke

As a young person, I would go spear-fishing often and I sought out those shy creators. I’m not very good at cooking this cephalopod, so now, here in the middle of the desert, I find it already cooked. We have an Asian Market about a 45 minute drive from us and they carry all kinds of goodies that DH and I look for, like Tako. The Asian influence is very strong in Hawaii, so is fishing; there are many dishes that start with Octopus.

Poke, pronounced POO-KAY, is a salad or appetizer made of your choice of seafood, with or with any vegetables. You can use raw or cooked products. There are as many Poke recipes as there are people in kitchens. I’ve read some cookbooks that have any number of ingredients, but in my book, the simpler the better.

Tako Poke Ingredients

Tako Poke

1/4 lb. cooked Octopus, chopped or sliced thin

1/2 of a large Sweet White Onion, rough chopped

2-3 Green Onions, thinly sliced

3 Tbsp. Soy Sauce

1 tsp. Sesame Oil

1/8 tsp. Red Pepper Flakes

1/4 tsp. toasted Sesame Seeds

In a large bowl, add all of the above ingredients and mix well.

Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 1 hour to allow the flavors to marry.

Tako Poke

Try this at your next potluck or cocktail party. Don’t tell anyone what it is, other than it’s a Hawaiian dish that you found. I did this recently at a friend’s home. I wasn’t sure if I should do that, but DH said that if no one ate it, that’s okay, he would.

Here’s how I look at a new recipe that I want to try, I make a smaller portion of it. That way if we don’t care for it, no harm, no foul.

Another quick blurb 

DH and I went to one of our favorite ‘Asian markets’ (I really don’t care for that term, but there it is) that is just about 45 minutes away from us, to find my beloved Hawaiian Sea Salt. 

Oh My Gravy All Over!! 

What the heck happened there?  They had closed off more than half of the store, barely any product in the place.  I DO NOT want to have to drive over 100 miles to get our Hawaii staple goods, i.e. Aloha Shoyu, Salt, Furikake, and the list goes on…